Universe Lost: Conclusion

This is the final installment of “Universe Lost.” I’m working on a new feature, “Mapping the Multiverse,” which will begin in two weeks to coincide with the season premiere of CW’s The Flash. I’ll also post a couple of standalone entries to fill the gap between now and then.

I’d really like to hear what readers think of the blog so far! You can contact me directly via the form at the end of the post or get a conversation going in the comments section below.

From 1978 to 1997, four Superman movies and four Batman movies grossed a total of $1.7 billion, giving DC Comics a virtual monopoly on successful super-hero film adaptations.

Now let’s compare that run to feature films adapting Marvel Comics characters to the big screen between 1978 and 1997.

There was only one: Howard the Duck.

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Universe Lost, Part 9: Not the Hero We Needed

NOTE: I originally planned for this to be the final installment of “Universe Lost,” but I wrote more than usual and can’t cut it down! So I’ll wrap up the series on Wednesday. After that, I’ll start a new feature on the Flash and the DC Multiverse, so stay tuned!

Last week, at Variety‘s Entertainment and Technology Summit in Beverly Hills, Diane Nelson, president of DC Entertainment since 2009, stated that there were no plans to connect the film adaptations of DC properties with their TV adaptations.

To regular readers of this blog, this should sound like a foregone conclusion on the part of DC and its parent company, Time Warner. Continue reading

Universe Lost, Part 3: Visions of Clowns and Demons

Part 3 of a series. Catch up on “Universe Lost,” Part 1 and Part 2.

When Warner Brothers hired Tim Burton to direct the first Batman feature film in 1986, he had only directed a single motion picture for theatrical release, 1985’s Pee-Wee’s Big Adventure, a whimsical low-budget vehicle for an off-beat stand-up comic. It was the work of a director who already had a singular visual style. Burton was capable of producing images that imprinted themselves upon the subconscious of the audience (as young Superadaptoid’s vivid memories of “Large Marge” can attest), so certainly he was well suited to work on a character who, in one of his earliest appearances, described himself as “a creature of the night, black, terrible….”

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