9/11 and Super-Heroes

The Superadaptoid has returned! I moved into a new place at the end of last month, and even though it was just a cross-town move, it still wrecked my writing schedule. But now I’m starting to settle in, so more blog posts will be coming soon.

I’m working on a series of Flash-related posts, but have decided to set them aside for the time being until I get a better feel for the direction that the current season of CW’s Flash TV show is taking. For my newest post, I’ve decided to tackle a more serious topic than usual: the effects of the real-world events of September 11, 2001 on the fictional settings of super-hero stories.

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Universe Lost, Part 8: Revenge of the Super Friends

In 1984, DC Comics characters were reaching new levels of media exposure through Kenner’s Super Powers toy line.

1984 comic book ad for Kenner Super Powers Collection

1984 comic book ad for Kenner’s Super Powers Collection

The success of the toys prompted a revival of the Super Friends Saturday morning cartoon, the first new episodes of the series to be produced since 1979. The season premiere pitted the Super Friends against Darkseid and his minions for the first time.

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Universe Lost, Part 7: “When the Old Gods Died!”

“THERE CAME A TIME WHEN THE OLD GODS DIED!”

That is the single most awesome sentence ever to appear in comic books. The caps lock on my computer turned itself on as soon as I started typing, such is the power in those words.

In 1971, Jack Kirby put those words on the first page of DC’s New Gods #1, setting out the themes of what would become known as the “Fourth World Saga.” It began with the end of the world, an apocalypse playing out over four exclamation-pointed sentences.

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Universe Lost, Part 6: Gods of New York

In New York City, anything is possible! Anything can happen … and it usually does.

— Stan Lee, Spider-Man and His Amazing Friends S1E2 (“The Crime of All Centuries”)

Stan Lee was a pest. He liked to irk people and it was one thing I couldn’t take. … He hasn’t changed a bit.

— Jack Kirby, The Comics Journal #134 (Feb. 1990)

There are no two comic creators more fascinating to me than Stan Lee and Jack Kirby. Kirby passed away in 1994, while Lee today is most visible through his perennial cameos in films based on Marvel characters.

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